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Why do certain faulty genes only cause cancer in some parts of the body?

This entry is part 21 of 21 in the series Grand Challenge

Our international team of scientists are tackling a fundamental question about how cancer develops: why do some gene faults only cause cancer in certain organs?

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The immune system preys on growing lung cancers, forcing them to evolve to survive

Scientists are taking a leaf out of Darwin’s evolutionary handbook to understand how lung cancer evolves.

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Rewriting the breast cancer rulebook 

Our scientists are rewriting the breast cancer rulebook. By looking at faults in tumour DNA, they’ve found that breast cancer is not 1 but 10 different diseases each with a different risk of coming back or spreading.

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Downloading the genetic rules of cancer 

Scientists are working to document all the faults in the DNA of cancer cells to help them understand how cancer works.

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Meet the scientists taking on 3 of the biggest challenges in cancer research

This entry is part 17 of 21 in the series Grand Challenge

Three new teams funded through our Grand Challenge are about to embark on research projects focusing on the microbiome, faulty genes and chronic inflammation.

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Science Snaps: digging for clues on how bowel cancer starts

This entry is part 23 of 27 in the series Science Snaps

We find out how stem cells could provide clues to how bowel cancer develops.

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Science Surgery: ‘How quickly do tumours develop?’

This entry is part 11 of 18 in the series Science Surgery

The time it takes for cancer to develop will vary from tumour to tumour. But on the whole, it’s slower than you might expect.

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Science surgery: “What’s the difference between the words genome, gene and chromosome?”

This entry is part 9 of 18 in the series Science Surgery

A genome, a gene and a chromosome are all structures of DNA. The difference between them is the amount of DNA they contain.

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Tackling ‘undruggable’ genes in lung and pancreatic cancers is this researcher’s life

Two important cancer genes cooperate to make lung cancers more aggressive in mice, according to new research.

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From cancer evolution to targeting faulty genetics – our new fellows

Find out the burning questions some of our researchers want to answer as they set up their own research teams for the first time.

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