Together we will beat cancer

Donate

Science Snaps: targeting cancers’ surroundings

This entry is part 28 of 28 in the series Science Snaps

Scientists are intercepting conversations between supporting cells and blood vessels that could help cancer spread.

Read More

Blood tests: using blood to detect cancer early

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Detecting cancer early

The idea of taking a small vial of blood and being able to detect cancer at its earliest and most treatable stages is an attractive one.

Read More

Science Surgery: ‘Why do some cancers metastasise, but others don’t?’

This entry is part 20 of 20 in the series Science Surgery

There are many unanswered questions about how and why cancer spreads around the body. But one thing we do know is that only some cancers metastasise.

Read More

Science Surgery: ‘How do cancer cells remain dormant for many years?’

This entry is part 19 of 20 in the series Science Surgery

It can be strange to think of cancer cells not dividing, but sleeping cancer cells could help to explain why some cancers come back after treatment.

Read More

Predicting lung cancer’s return at surgery

New lung cancer research shows that detecting potential tumour cells leaving the vein in the lung at surgery may predict the diseases return.

Read More

Science Surgery: ‘Why do some cancer treatments stop working after so long?’

This entry is part 17 of 20 in the series Science Surgery

Cancer treatments can work in lots of different ways, aiming to kill tumour cells or keep them under control. Ideally they cause tumours to shrink, but they can also be considered successful if they stop tumours growing. But unfortunately, the effects don’t always last forever.

Read More

Science Snaps: solving the mystery of an oddly-shaped tumour

This entry is part 27 of 28 in the series Science Snaps

Scientists have developed an entirely new way to look at tumours. And it’s helped them solve the mystery of how some pancreatic tumours develop.

Read More

Science Snaps: seeing the effects of proteins we know nothing about

This entry is part 26 of 28 in the series Science Snaps

Anh Hoang Le, a PhD student at the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute in Glasgow, studies two proteins that we know curiously little about: CYRI-A and CYRI-B.

Read More

Learning about advanced cancer from the people who donate their bodies after death

We look at the research made possible by people who donate their bodies after their death, including helping scientists understand how advanced cancers spread.

Read More

Science Surgery: ‘How do tumours ‘know’ where to spread?’

This entry is part 14 of 20 in the series Science Surgery

It’s hard to talking about cancers ‘knowing’ something, but they can have predictable patterns of spread. And scientists are beginning to understand why.

Read More