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Children develop different types of cancers than adults, with around 1,900 children under the age of 14 diagnosed each year. The most common types of childhood cancer are acute leukaemia and cancers of the brain and spinal cord. Thanks to research into new treatments, 8 in 10 children diagnosed with cancer will live for at least five years.

Science Surgery: ‘How are children’s cancers different from adults’ cancers?’

This entry is part 22 of 22 in the series Science Surgery

Understanding why children get cancer is a huge task and extremely complex. In our latest Science Surgery, we spoke with Dr Francis Mussai about the differences between children and adult’s cancers.

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More diversity is needed in patient information and campaigns

We spoke to Siobhan, Nikki and Jessica about their experiences of childhood cancer.

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The changing landscape of children’s cancer treatment

We spoke to Professor Lou Chesler and Dr Lynley Marshall about the innovative studies that are aiming to make children’s cancer treatment more tailored.

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Grandparents of children with cancer: “I would never want to go through it again”

As part of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, we spoke to 3 grandparents about their experience of having a grandchild with cancer.

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Different challenges, same determination: how we’re tackling children’s and young people’s cancers

Through our new research strategy, we’re determined to improve survival and reduce long-term side effects for children and young people with cancer.

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Science Surgery: ‘Does cancer affect the future development of children?’

This entry is part 18 of 22 in the series Science Surgery

Our latest Science Surgery instalment answers the question, ‘Does cancer affect the future development of children?’

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Siblings affected by childhood cancer: ‘The fact that she’s been diagnosed twice makes the journey even longer’ – Alyssa’s story

Alyssa shares the story of her younger sister, Alayna, who was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma – a type of bone cancer – in September 2012.

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Siblings affected by childhood cancer: ‘I’m so proud of what he’s done and how far he’s come’ – James’s story

James shares the story of his younger brother Max, who was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukaemia, a type of blood cancer, in May 2003.

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Siblings affected by childhood cancer: ‘It’s one of those moments when time kind of stands still’ – Meg and Beth’s story

Meg and Beth share the story of their younger sister Eve, who was diagnosed with Ewing’s Sarcoma – a type of bone cancer – in July 2015.

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Making chemotherapy kinder for childhood leukaemia

Guest author, Dr Rosanna Jackson, outlines what scientists are doing to make treatment for one type of childhood leukaemia kinder.

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