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Science Surgery: ‘How do tumours ‘know’ where to spread?’

Category: Science blog April 18, 2019 15 comments

This entry is part 14 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

It’s hard to talking about cancers ‘knowing’ something, but they can have predictable patterns of spread. And scientists are beginning to understand why.

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Science Surgery: ‘Why doesn’t the immune system attack cancer cells?’

Category: Science blog February 28, 2019 8 comments

This entry is part 13 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

In this Science Surgery post Millie asks: ‘Why doesn’t the immune system attack cancer cells?’ The short answer is it does! But sometimes it needs a helping hand from exciting new treatments.

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Science Surgery: ‘Why do never-smokers get lung cancer?’

Category: Science blog November 16, 2018 37 comments

This entry is part 12 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

We don’t always know why never-smokers develop lung cancer, but the data suggests that genetics play a role, as well as environmental or occupational exposures.

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Science Surgery: ‘How quickly do tumours develop?’

Category: Science blog October 18, 2018 1 comment

This entry is part 11 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

The time it takes for cancer to develop will vary from tumour to tumour. But on the whole, it’s slower than you might expect.

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Science Surgery: ‘Will cancer ever be eradicated completely?’

Category: Science blog July 23, 2018 5 comments

This entry is part 10 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

Eradicating diseases isn’t easy. Here we look at which cancers are preventable, and how detecting cancers earlier could make a difference.

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Science surgery: “What’s the difference between the words genome, gene and chromosome?”

Category: Science blog May 29, 2018 Comments are closed

This entry is part 9 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

A genome, a gene and a chromosome are all structures of DNA. The difference between them is the amount of DNA they contain.

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Science Surgery: ‘Do we all have potentially cancerous cells in our bodies?’

Category: Science blog April 18, 2018 1 comment

This entry is part 8 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

In this instalment of our Science Surgery series, we explore what gives a cell the potential to become cancerous, and how the body stops this from happening.

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Science Surgery: ‘What’s being done to use treatments in different types of cancer?’

Category: Science blog March 12, 2018 4 comments

This entry is part 7 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

In this Science Surgery post we explore the work being done to use existing treatments in other types of cancer.

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Science Surgery: ‘Does having had cancer make you more likely to develop it again?’

Category: Science blog December 15, 2017 2 comments

This entry is part 6 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

In this instalment of our Science Surgery series, we’re tackling a question we were asked on second cancers.

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Science Surgery: ‘Is the one-size-fits-all treatment approach obsolete?’

Category: Science blog November 14, 2017 1 comment

This entry is part 5 of 14 in the series Science Surgery

Will personalised medicine become the norm of cancer treatment? In this Science Surgery instalment, we asked experts for their thoughts on this question.

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